A document analysis john marshall harlan dissent in plessy v ferguson

Why may it not require sheriffs to assign whites to one side of a courtroom and blacks to the other? It was said in argument that the statute of Louisiana does not discriminate against either race but prescribes a rule applicable alike to white and colored citizens.

Digital file no. It is true that the real and personal property necessary to the establishment and management of the railroad is vested in the corporation, but it is in trust for the public. May it not now be reasonably expected that astute men of the dominant race, who affect to be disturbed at the possibility that the integrity of the white race may be corrupted, or that its supremacy will be imperiled, by contact on public highways with black people, will endeavor to procure statutes requiring white and black jurors to be separated in the jury box by a "partition," and that, upon retiring from the courtroom to consult as to their verdict, such partition, if it be a moveable one, shall be taken to their consultation room and set up in such way as to prevent black jurors from coming too close to their brother jurors of the white race.

Railroad corporations of Louisiana did not make discrimination among whites in the matter of accommodation for travelers. It was, consequently, adjudged that a state law that excluded citizens of the colored race from juries, because of their race and however well qualified in other respects to discharge the duties of jurymen, was repugnant to the Fourteenth Amendment.

separate but equal

Most helpful essay resource ever! But it seems that we have yet, in some of the States, a dominant race — a superior class of citizens, which assumes to regulate the enjoyment of civil rights, common to all citizens, upon the basis of race.

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